Guest Blog: Craving Nutrition: Eating for Change During Pregnancy


I have been contacted by a sweet lady from Healthline. Healthline is a very informative and user friendly website where you can learn more about medical information and trusted health advice. Here is a very informative and fun article to read written by Leslie Vandever related to the topic of Pregnancy, specifically Cravinggssss 🙂 Enjoy


Craving Nutrition: Eating for Change During Pregnancy

By Leslie Vandever

If you’re pregnant and crave certain foods—the famous pickles and ice cream, for instance, or salty corn chips dipped in cottage cheese, or frequent chocolate fixes, or even tasty helpings of steak fat—don’t feel alone. Food cravings during pregnancy are well-known and go with that rapidly rounding belly like cookies go with milk.

Scientists can’t tell us why, exactly. But at least some cravings may originate in the body’s need for specific nutrients. Pica—a craving to eat things that aren’t food, like clay, or coal—seems to come from a need for more iron in the diet. Women who crave ice cream or cottage cheese may just need more calcium. Chocolate is high in magnesium, so a woman whose body is lacking enough of that mineral may make a beeline for the candy machine. Or maybe her blood sugar level is low, so sweets sound good to her.

Or maybe she just loves chocolate.

Because a pregnant woman’s hormone levels fluctuate hugely, there may be an emotional side to cravings, as well. That urgent need for peaches and corn flakes may really be a subconscious need for emotional support, like a warm hug or a listening, empathetic ear.

The thing to remember is that there’s nothing wrong with craving specific foods during pregnancy. It’s an entirely normal phenomenon. Cravings have been noted—and commented upon with everything from humor to earnest seriousness—for hundreds of years. They occur in all cultures all over the world (though the foods that are the subjects of the cravings may differ).

The best way to deal with cravings is to eat a healthy, balanced, varied, and nutritious diet. By paying close attention to what and how you eat, you’ll be able to supply your body with everything it needs to keep both you and your growing infant healthy and strong. You may not have cravings as often.

According to the American Pregnancy Association, “Pregnancy is the one time in your life when your eating habits directly affect another person.”

By eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, whole grain breads, cereals, and pastas, low-fat dairy foods, beans, nuts, and legumes, and lean proteins like chicken and, in limited quantities, fish, you’ll give your new baby her best possible start in life. At the same time, you’ll be healthier than ever, gaining only as much weight as necessary.

Your body goes through ginormous change during pregnancy. You gain weight so your body can nurture and grow your baby; your breasts swell and fill with life-giving milk; your uterus stretches to accommodate an infant that will, by the time she’s born, weigh between six and 10 pounds (on average). Your blood volume will also have increased by as much as 60 percent.

For all this necessary and positive change to take place—and to keep you and the baby healthy in the process—you must get the right nutrients in the right quantities. During the second and third trimesters you need to eat an extra 300 healthy calories a day. In addition, some doctors and midwives prescribe or suggest extra vitamins and iron supplements, or recommend that you eat certain foods, like spinach, liver, and citrus fruits.

Keep your food cravings in context and under control. Feeding an occasional yen for butter brickle ice cream won’t hurt you or your baby, but eating a bowl of it every day will cause problems. If nothing else, you’ll gain more weight than you really should, which can be hard to lose after the baby is born.

And, you could try replacing that sugary, fattening ice cream with yogurt topped with fruit and granola, or something else along those lines that’s much more nutritious. Swap carrots for potato chips, or dried apricots for toaster pastries. You get the idea.

You can also curb cravings by getting plenty of sleep and exercise, and by drinking 8 measuring cups of water each day. Distract yourself with a phone conversation, a good TV show, or a good book instead of indulging the craving. Talk with your doctor. Be wise. Cravings are just that: cravings. You don’t have to satisfy them.

 

NewWren

 

Leslie Vandever is a professional journalist and freelance writer with more than 25 years of experience. She craved cottage cheese and corn chips when she was pregnant with her daughter 32 years ago, so she knows that of which she writes. Vandever lives in the foothills of Northern California.

 

 
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Having a Baby… Juice Juice Juice


It has been such a long time since I last posted on the blog.

I gave birth to a healthy handsome baby boy. Throughout my pregnancy I juiced every single day. Green juice, apple juice, carrot juice, and different combinations of juice all ran through my veins and replenished my system and that of my baby. He was born and could hold his head up and I still do believe that his strength is directly related to the juices I have been consuming. I focused on fetal development and requirements and juiced ingredients that would help boost my health and that of my growing baby in me.

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My Baby Boy

I want to share some juice recipes that would help those who are planning to get pregnant, and those who are already going through their journey at being pregnant.

To Those Who are Trying to Get Pregnant

First thing I want to share with you is a detox. It took me a while to get pregnant and I read somewhere that a cleanse can help reboot my system. I did a four day juice fast (read my blog post about it here). A month after the cleanse and healthy eating I got pregnant. All you got to do is try to eliminate sugars in your diet. Eat healthy food and if you have the will to go vegan for a few weeks then go ahead and do that. As for me all I did is I went on a juice fast for 4 days. I eliminated caffeine from my system and all sugars. I ate a lot of greens. I exercised daily and drank lots of water and fluid.

Here are a few juice recipes that help with fertility.

Natural Fertility

This juice has a ton of vitamins and minerals. It is high in iron, calcium and is alkalizing. Drink this blend to nourish the reproductive system and enrich your cells, boosting your fertility and chances of getting pregnant (Natural Fertility Info).

5 Fertility RecipesTo Those who are Pregnant

During the first trimester, the embryo becomes a fetus with all organs fully formed. Taking these dramatic changes and developments in your womb many things are also happening to your body to be able to accommodate the needs of the baby. One of the well known physical side effects is nausea. Here are a few juice recipes to help you through the first trimester.

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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During the second trimester you are most energetic and happily pregnant. Now that all the major organs and systems have formed in the fetus, the following six months will be spent growing. This means that you require a lot of vitamins and nutrients to help the growing fetus in you. I drank a lot of grapefruit and green juice during that time. Here are a few recipes:

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In the third trimester heartburn kicks in. More growth happening to the fetus and lungs are developing and maturing. I started to feel heavy and easily tired during the last few weeks. To keep your energy up and to help you through what is to become of your life try these healthy recipes.

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To Those Who Gave Birth

Enjoy motherhood, stay healthy and juice on 🙂

—-

Rasha Nasser Khalil 

Also see my other juice recipe posts and related articles:

– Juice Recipes for Pregnancy

– Juice Recipes for Weight Loss 

– Juice Recipes to Lower High Blood Pressure

– Juice Recipes for Ailments

– Detox Juice Recipes

– Jay Kordich – Juice Recipes

– Green Juice Recipes

– Guest Blog: Craving Nutrition: Eating for Change During Pregnancy